Forum ::: Mammutbaum- Community

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein oder registrieren Sie sich.

Einloggen mit Benutzername, Passwort und Sitzungslänge

Autor Thema: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings  (Gelesen 21092 mal)

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff

Ich poste hier ein paar Zitate aus meinen Lieblingsbüchern. Leider alles auf englisch...
Bitte entschuldigt die kunstlose Anhäufung, ich schaffs einfach zeitlich nicht es verdaulicher zu servieren. Ich werde aber im Laufe des Jahres versuchen immer wieder mal einen Abschnitt davon zusammenzufassen und Vorschläge für die Anzucht abzuleiten.
Wer sich zutraut einen noch so kleinen Abschnitt und egal wie holprig zu übersetzen, nur zu, das wäre eine Riesenhilfe! Wer nicht so gerne auf englisch liest kann, kann es mal mit Babelfish versuchen. Der Babelfish verdreht aber manches - man kann sich nicht darauf verlassen.

Fragen und Kommentare, besonders zu eigenen Erfahrungen, herzlich erwünscht ! Gerne mit Fotos :) Genaue Quellenangaben am Ende als eigenes Posting.
« Letzte Änderung: 04-März-2008, 23:45 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #1 am: 04-März-2008, 23:07 »

John Muir: The Mountains of California. [4]

Chapter 3: The Snow.

"The first snow that whitens the Sierra, usually falls about the end of October or early in November, to a depth of a few inches, after months of the most charming Indian summer weather imaginable. But in a few days, this light covering mostly melts from the slopes exposed to the sun and causes but little apprehension on the part of mountaineers who may be lingering among the high peaks at this time.
The first general winter storm that yields snow that is to form a lasting portion of the season’s supply, seldom breaks on the mountains before the end of November.
(...)
The first heavy fall is usually from about two to four feet in depth. Then, with intervals of splendid sunshine, storm succeeds storm, heaping snow on snow, until thirty to fifty feet has fallen. But on account of its settling and compacting, and the almost constant waste from melting and evaporation, the average depth actually found at any time seldom exceeds ten feet in the forest region, or fifteen feet along the slopes of the summit peaks."

"It often happens that while one side of a lake basin is hopelessly snow-buried and frozen, the other, enjoying sunshine, is adorned with beautiful flower-gardens."



USDA Forest Service Database [3]

Seedling development

"Giant sequoia seeds germinate best when totally buried in disturbed mineral soil. April, May, September, and October temperatures are best for early development."

"Soil moisture conditions and seedling survival are generally better in spring than during any other season. Light conditions are generally best for growing at one-half full sunlight."

[Note micha: Because of the clean mountain air and the southern latitude, energy input in the Sierra Nevada is considerably higher than in lowlands of north-western Europe, where i would suggest to expose SeqGig to full sun as soon as possible.]

Upon germination, the seedling stands 3/4 to 1 inch (1.9-2.5 cm) high, usually with four cotyledons. By autumn, seedlings have up to six branches and are 3 to 4 inches (8-10 cm) tall. After the second year, the seedling attains a height of 8 to 12 inches (20-30 cm) with a taproot penetrating to a depth of 10 to 15 inches
(25-38 cm) [28]."


R. J. Hartesveldt et al: The Giant Sequoia of the Sierra Nevada [1]

Chapter 5

Conditions for germination

"Yet, in some sequoia groves, there are extensive areas of almost bare ground within the seeding range of mature sequoias on which we find no sequoia seedlings year after year. In other instances, mineral soil plays absolutely no role in germination and small sequoia seedlings growing from rotting stumps and other masses of organic debris such as thick leaf litter."

"Mineral soil, then, is only one of several influences upon germination of sequoia seeds. Statistically, it is the most important substrate for germination, but is not an absolute requirement."

"When lying on the exposed soil surface, the seeds not only quickly lose their viability but also seem to germinate poorly even when the soil is moist. Fry and White (1930) claim that seeds pressed against the soil surface by heavy snow germinate well, but recent experimentation indicates that germination is greatest when the seed is completely surrounded by moist soil, as when burried. That seeds germinate on the surface is well documented; but again, survival is extremely low."

"Stark's field experiments indicate that although germination actually occurs over a very wide range of temperatures, namely, from 30° to 92°F (-1.6°C to 34°C), optimum temperatures are most common during the months of April, May, September, and October. Soil moisture conditions and seedling survival are generally better in the spring than during any other season. High summer temperatures and the resulting desiccation of the soil greatly reduce germination."

"Experiments indicate that sequoia seeds will germinate in full sunlight and also in the dark, but that optimal germination occurs during the growing season when the light is approximately one-half full strength of the sun. When stronger, light is converted into excessive heat energy and thus dries the soil."

"Closely allied is the pH or degree of acidity or basicity of the soil, Stark (1968) found that a slightly acid soil (pH 6-7) produced the highest germination percentage at a temperature of 68°F and concluded that pH was not a limiting factor in natural sequoia habitats. She found that strongly basic soils (pH 9) stunted the seedling growth, but did not retard germination. It did, however, alter the color of the foliage to an intense blue-green."

"We have already mentioned that seeds on the surface generally do not germinate because insufficient moisture is transmitted to the embryo. Burial of the seed is important, but the seed must not be buried too deeply. While seeds placed deeper than 1 inch may germinate, the developing shoot will seldom reach the surface and survive. The optimum depth, which seeds rarely exceed in normal circumstances, is about 0.25 inch (Beetham 1962)."

"Seeds will often become wedged in a small crack in the soil alongside a partially buried rock or piece of wood, which provides the necessary protection against radiation and proper soil moisture conditions. This is also an advantage in seedling survival, the next most delicate stage in the sequoia life cycle (Hartesveldt and Harvey 1967)."


Conditions for seedling survival:

"Muir (1878) records that not one seed in a million germinates, and that not one seedling in 10,000 attains maturity. These figures, widely repeated, may be figurative rather than literal, but the frailty of the species during this stage is no myth."

"Because of the small amount of food stored in sequoia seeds, the newly germinated seedlings must become rapidly self-sufficient. Fry and White (1930) state that the earliest stage of germination (extension of the radicle or primary root) takes place beneath the snow, and that the seed roots are as much as 1 or 2 inches long before the snow melts. This may affect the survival of the emerging cotyledons, or seed leaves. As soon as the protective seed coat is shed from the new leafy shoot, a root system must be functional to supply the cotyledons with the necessities for photosynthetic activity, and because sequoias apparently produce few, if any, root hairs, root length becomes the more essential."

"Beetham (1962) has amply demonstrated that seedlings grow best in full sunlight where the soil is protected by at least a light layer of leaf litter."

"One of the more difficult forms of seedling death to assess is that from reduced light brought about by canopy shading that may starve the plant. Although Baker (1949) lists sequoia as having intermediate tolerance to shade, Beetham (1962) indicates clearly that it is very sensitive to low light intensity. This is supported by the fact that sequoia seedlings are seldom found in areas densely populated with taller vegetation. A striking example of death influenced by shading was found by Hartesveldt (1963) in Yosemite's Mariposa Grove. At the end of a 25-year period, of the several thousand seedlings established there and recorded on a park map dated 1934, only 13.8% remained alive in a 1959 resurvey of the same area. Hundreds of dead saplings, twisted and contorted in dense shade, demonstrated the effect of the heavy overtopping crown canopy composed largely of white fir (Fig. 10).(...) Undoubtedly, excessive shading may be coupled with another agent such as root fungi or poor soil-moisture conditions."

"Excessive moisture is a factor which limits gas exchange at the root surface because it usurps the pore space normally occupied by gases. Low soil oxygen content reduces root respiration which reduces water intake and photosynthesis, eventually to the point of cessation. This is probably a common cause of seedling death along the edges of meadows where seeds of sequoias are often scattered abundantly, but where seedlings seldom survive."


H. Thomas Harvey et al: Giant Sequoia Ecology - Fire and Reproduction [2]

Introduction

"The microenvironment of the forest ground surface first influences seed survival, then germination, and upon germination, the development and survival of the seedlings. The early seedling stage is probably one of the most critical as far as the survival of the species is concerned. Hartesveldt and Harvey (1967) followed over 2,000 seedlings which had naturally seeded in after the prescription burning of two test plots. At the end of the first summer 45% were alive. By the end of October, 30% remained alive, and by the next summer only 10%. Only 1.4% of the seedlings were still alive after two summers of growth, thus in 18 months 98.6% mortality had occurred."

"Although most tree species have some kind of seed dormancy (Kramer and Kozlowski 1960), the giant sequoia seeds germinate as soon as conditions are favorable."

"Seed germination of the giant sequoia begins in February or March and proceeds throughout the summer as long as conditions are suitable (Schubert 1962). Giant sequoia seeds germinate best in moist soil about 1 cm below the surface, at 10°C to 20°C, pH 6 to pH 7, and reduced light (5,000 f.c.) (Stark 1968b). Stark also reported that selected large seeds (8 mm average length) germinated 153% better than a mixture of normal seeds, while small seeds (under 4 mm average length) germinated only 6.9% as well as the controls."

"Those seedlings which had reached only the cotyledon stage in the summer had only a 20% survival by October, while those which had developed secondary leaves and also started branching, were able to survive at about 75%. inasmuch as seedlings grow roots proportionally larger than shoots, it seems reasonable to suggest that the larger shoots supported larger roots which may have penetrated to greater depths. They had reached the receding soil moistures which helped them survive beyond the summer months into October."

Discussion and summary: Seed production

"The seeds produced in the cones are released to become potential seedlings in two major ways. There appears to be two complementary reproductive strategies that have evolved in the giant sequoia. One is the persistent constant release of seeds throughout the year and throughout the decades in the absence of fire. The other strategy is the dramatic evulsive event that fire invokes, where seeds are released in tremendous numbers. The constant rain of seeds and cones released by Douglas squirrel and Phymatodes nitidus activity provides a seed inoculum which may find suitable ground conditions in the root pits of fallen trees or the action of streams and avalanches. However intermittent, fire, particularly hot fires, may provide an unusually heavy seedfall. The fires need not be intense throughout the entire area burned, but may, due to the uneven presence or absence of heavy fuel, vary greatly in temperature (Kilgore 1972). These hot spots, as was shown in our burn pile areas, induce exceptional increase in seed release and provide the most suitable seedling substrate."

Seedling establishment:

"The friable nature of the soil readily permits seed and root penetration. The latter is apparently critical for survival of sequoia seedlings because summer drought appears to be the most critical factor in their mortality."

"Although nutrient levels may be down after a hot fire, St. John and Rundel (1976) have found that seedlings with subadequate nitrogen had a greater root to shoot ratio than those with adequate levels."

"When one links the above with the shade intolerance of the giant sequoia, an interesting hypothesis emerges: The greater the sunlight the greater the root penetration even though dry soil may be deeper in sunlit areas (Daubenmire 1974). Thus giant sequoias which survive best in sunlit areas should have greater root length in soils which are subject to rapid desiccation. Burn piles with friable soils and low nitrogen would also aid root penetration and provide the optimal site for seedling survival."

« Letzte Änderung: 05-März-2008, 01:24 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #2 am: 04-März-2008, 23:09 »

References:

[1] R. J. Hartesveldt, H. T. Harvey, H. S. Shellhammer, R. E. Stecker (1975).
The Giant Sequoia of the Sierra Nevada. San José University, California.
U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Washington, D. C.
http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/science/hartesveldt/index.htm

[2] H. Thomas Harvey, Howard S. Shellhammer, Ronald E. Stecker (1980).
Giant Sequoia Ecology - Fire and Reproduction.
San Jose State University, California.
U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Washington, D. C.
http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/science/12/index.htm

[3] USDA Forest Service Database.
Sequoiadendron giganteum - Species Information.
United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana.
http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/seqgig/all.html

[4] John Muir (1894): The Mountains of California.
http://www.yosemite.ca.us/john_muir_writings/the_mountains_of_california
« Letzte Änderung: 04-März-2008, 23:20 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Joergel

  • Gast
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #3 am: 04-März-2008, 23:22 »

Vielen Dank für die interessanten Zitate!

Was ich für mich bisher rausgezogen habe:

1. Samen nicht nur auf die Erde legen (habe ich bisher gemacht, weil ich dachte, dass es alles Lichtkeimer sind)
2. Nicht zu nass (war vorher auch klar)
3. In tiefe Töpfe pikieren, weil sie schnell tiefe Wurzeln bilden
4. Eher saure Erde (Aussaaterde ist ja sowieso leicht sauer)
und vor allem
5. Nicht traurig sein, wenn viele Sämlinge nicht durchkommen.
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #4 am: 05-März-2008, 00:39 »

Jörg, Du hast ein paar wesentliche Dinge gut auf den Punkt gebracht. Hier noch ein paar Anregungen und Ergänzungen:

1. Du hast doch sicher bemerkt daß dieser Beitrag sich ausschließlich um Sequoiadendron dreht ? Bitte sei vorsichtig mit Übertragungen auf die anderen Arten. Ich übernehme dafür keine Gewähr !

2. Ein pH von 6-7 ist für mitteleuropäische Nadelbäume nicht sauer, sondern vergleichsweise basisch (im Sinne von basenreich). Hier bei uns hat Koniferenwald-Oberboden natürlicherweise (also ohne sauren Regen) einen pH <5. Mit 4,5 im Oberboden sind Fichtenkeimlinge schon zufrieden. Mein winziges Fichtenwäldchen war als ich es übernommen habe stark versauert, mit pH 3,6 noch in 80cm Tiefe - das ist das andere Ende.

In der Sierra gibt es solche Böden mit pH 6 oder 7, weil Granit langsam verwittert und noch sehr mineralienreich ist, weil Nährstoffe durch die Eiszeiten freigesetzt wurden, und weil in den flacheren Hanglagen (Meadows) der Groves durch Schneeschmelze und Regen immer wieder feine und grobe Stoffe abgelagert werden.

Es geht aber nicht nur um den Mineraliengehalt, sondern auch um die Pufferkapazität. Die ist in saurem Boden nur sehr gering. Wenn man saueren Torf kräftig düngt, wird es den Mammutlingen dennoch nicht schmecken. Das wäre wie der Versuch Salz mit Zucker auszugleichen.

3. Pikieren ist pikant :) Die feine Wurzel des Sequoiadendron-Keinlings ist alles was er hat. Der Samen bringt ja fast keine Nährstoffe mit sich. Zudem erwartet der Keimling, und ist auch total darauf angewiesen, so schnell wie nur möglich in der Tiefe Wasser zu finden - so sehr daß er anfangs nicht mal seitliche Wurzelhaare ausbildet. Was ich damit sagen will ist, ein kleines Stückchen Wurzel ab und das wars dann - den im Wachstum stockenden Keimling holt sofort der Pilz. Verletzungen sind beim Pikieren aber nur sehr schwer zu vermeiden. Im Grunde müsste man ganze Bodenstücke sauber ausstechen. Es ist allemal besser gleich in sehr tiefe Gefäße zu säen, in denern sie noch bis zum nächsten Herbst bleiben können, oder man verwendet solche Jiffy-Pots, die können z.B. in Styropor oder in Kies stecken. Die sollten aber auch sehr tief sein (30cm) damit sich die Hauptwurzel nicht im Kreis drehen muß.

4. Geht die Wurzel überhaupt in die Tiefe wenn gleichmässig und reichlich gewässert wird ? Vieleicht muß sie schnell wachsen damit sie eine große Fläche zur Wasseraufnahme gewinnt ? Sie bildet ja ersteinmal keine Haarwurzeln aus. Und Wurzeln wachen normalerweise eben geotropisch nach unten.

Wieso macht eine Baumart das, keine Haarwurzeln ausbilden, wenn es so viele Probleme mit sich bringt (u.a. eine Mortalität von nahezu 99% in der Sierra).

Es scheint daß Sequoiadendron in dieser Hinsicht von Bedingungen 'ausgeht' die für andere Koniferen unserer Breitengrade geradezu traumhaft sind. Dies und vieles mehr deutet für mich darauf hin, daß selbst die wunderbare Sierra nicht ihr ursprüngliches Habitat ist.
« Letzte Änderung: 14-Februar-2009, 03:03 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #5 am: 09-Mai-2008, 23:35 »

Gelegentlich fragt man sich wie die optimale Wasserversorgung bei Sequoiadendron-Keimlingen denn aussieht, bzw. wie weit das Spektrum zum Trockenen oder Nassen reicht. Ich ermuntere den Lesser hier eigene Erfahrungen, insbesondere auch Fehlschläge, mitzuteilen !

Ausgehend von den Tatsachen daß Sequoiadendron 1. als Keimling sehr schnell einen langen Wurzelfaden in die Tiefe schickt und 2. am Naturstandort ein Gebirgsbaum ist, der in den zwar feuchten Meadows der Hochtäler die zentralen sumpfigen Bereiche jedoch meidet, kann man schlußfolgern, daß die Keimlinge einen tiefen gut durchlüfteten Wurzelraum brauchen.
Es stellt sich aber die Frage, wie tief dieser denn sein muß, und ob sich die Wurzeln vieleicht einfach nur mehr lateral ausbreiten würden wenn in der Tiefe Sauerstoffmangel herrscht. Mir sind dazu keine Erfahrungen bekannt. In der Regel ist es ja bereits der physische Widerstand der Topfwand oder des Grundgesteines der das Wurzelwachstum von vorneherein limitiert.

Durch ein flaches Wurzelwerk erhöht sich in der Natur gerade beim Keimling die Gefahr des Vertrocknens im Sommer dramatisch -- außer bei sehr hoch anstehendem Grundwasser bei gleichzeitig gut durchlüftetem Oberboden, was meines Wissens kaum vorkommt. In der Aufzucht unter menschlicher Obhut wäre eine solche in der Natur ungewöhnliche Situation jedoch herstellbar, etwa indem entsprechend hohe und breite Töpfe in ein flaches Wasserbasin gestellt werden. Hierzu wären experimentelle Erfahrungen sehr wertvoll.

Es gibt ein paar Hinweise, die so interpretiert werden können, daß Sequoiadendron auch unter anderen Bedingungen wachsen kann als vom Naturstandort her bekannt ist. Die hier angeführten Beispiele müssen aber erst noch im Einzelnen anhand der Originalquellen analysiert werden, bevor eine genauere Aussage möglich ist.

(1) Ist Sequoiadendron ein typischer Gebirgsbaum ? Nach Hartesveldt und Harvey et al [1] beträgt die durchschnittliche maximale Tiefe von Hauptwurzeln bei Altbäumen nur 90 cm, die der Feinwurzeln ca.150 cm. Hier ist die Tiefe der Hauptwurzeln relevant, welche theoretisch bereits in den ersten Jahrzehnten angelegt wurden. Sie ist angesichts des Wasserbedarfs erstaunlich gering. Das enorme Wurzelwerk, welches notwendig ist um die riesigen Kronen zu versorgen, wird sich demnach hauptsächlich relativ flach über eine große Fläche ausbreiten. Interessanterweise hat Sequoiadendron i.d.R. einen mächtigen Wurzelanlauf (bud swell), welcher den Schwerpunkt deutlich nach unten verlagert und auf diese Weise dazu beiträgt daß die Bäume im Sturm nicht umfallen. Solch eine Verdickung ist auch von Taxodium bekannt, und hier wäre ein Zusammenhang zum Standort naheliegend der ein flaches Wurzelwerk erzwingt und ein Festklammern im Untergrund schwierig macht. Im Vergleich dazu ist mir diese Form bei flach wurzelnden Fichten an den Rändern von Hochmooren bisher nicht aufgefallen; diese Bäume sind, wenn sie eine entsprechende Höhe erreichen, besonders sturmgefährdet.

(2) Es gibt fossile Funde aus dem Miozän von Fundorten entlang des Truckee Rivers nahe Pyramid Lake, Nevada  (UCMP Database [5] PA: 739, 740, 744, 746, 747 und 758) die immer schon Tiefland waren. Andererseits könnten diese Fossilien aus höheren Lagen sedimentiert worden sein. Siehe dazu auch Referenzen [6] und [7].

(3) Davis (2000) [8] fand (wie auch schon andere zuvor) Sequoiadendron-Pollen aus dem Dryas (vor etwa 11 000 Jahren) und frühen Holozän in Bohrkernen des ehemaligen Seegrundes des heute trockenliegenden Tulare Lake, welche nahelegen daß Sequoiadendron zu den Eiszeiten entlang der westwärts dränenden Flüsse in tiefere Lagen, möglicherweise bis in die Ebene des San Joaquin Valleys, wanderte. Wiederum ist zu bedenken daß diese Pollenablagerungen durch die Zuflüsse auch aus höheren Lagen eingetragen worden sein können. Es ist jedoch eine interessante Frage wie Sequoiadendron denn eigentlich entlang der Flüsse abwärts gewandert sein mag.

(4) Hartesveldt und Harvey [1] beschreiben einige wenige, sehr seltene Fälle von Sequoiadendron-Bäume, welcheauf auf Kiesbänken an Flußufern stehen. Man vermutet, daß sie in 'Litter' (Humus, fortgerissene Bodenvegetation, Äste, und in tieferen Schichten zunehmend Sand) gekeimt sind welcher durch Hochwasser aufgehäuft wurde. Die Autoren führen aber auch an daß diese Keimlinge gewöhnlich im Sommer (wenn der Wasserstand fällt) vertrocknen. Es stellt sich die Frage, ob Sequoiadendron für gewöhnlich an solchen Standorten nicht zu finden ist, weil eine Verjüngung unmöglich ist, vieleicht jedoch nicht wegen des hohen Wasserstandes, sondern im Gegenteil wegen mangelhafter Wasserversorgung im Sommer.
« Letzte Änderung: 09-August-2014, 13:49 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #6 am: 09-Mai-2008, 23:36 »

Bis hierher neu hinzukommende Referenzen:

[5] UCMP Online Database (nach Genus "Sequoiadendron" suchen)
http://ucmpdb.berkeley.edu

[6] UCMP’s summer field adventures 2001, Page 4: Sequoiadendron cones at Washoe Lands Plant site near Carson City
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/museum/ucmp_news/2001/11-01/summer4.html

[7] Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Educational Series E-45 (2006): Earth Science Week Field Trip October 7 or 8, 2006. Rockin' Along the River. A geologic tour along the Truckee River from Verdi to Wadsworth.

[8] Owen K. Davis (2000): Pollen analysis of Tulare Lake, California: Great Basin-like vegetation in Central California during the full-glacial and early Holocene. Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA Received 6 July 1998; accepted 8 June 1999. Available online 11 January 2000.

"Giant sequoia was widespread along the Sierra Nevada streams draining into Tulare Lake, prior to 9000 yr B.P."

Zur besonders trockenen Verhältnissen siehe auch das Lehrbeispiel Freiburger Seepark.

Eine gute Synopsis mit weiteren Referenzen ist von Weatherspoon, in Silvics of North America
http://www.na.fs.fed.us/pubs/silvics_manual/volume_1/sequoiadendron/giganteum.htm
« Letzte Änderung: 27-Juli-2008, 21:21 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
« Letzte Änderung: 27-September-2013, 16:55 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Ökologie des Keimlings -- Feuer
« Antwort #8 am: 24-August-2013, 22:07 »

Man kann die Keimlings-Ökologie des Bergmammutbaumes nicht ohne Feuer diskutieren :)

In diesen Tagen brennt gerade das 'Rim Fire', ein großes Gebiet westlich angrenzend zum Yosemite Nationalpark. Ein Übergreifen auf den Merced oder Tuolumne Grove ist nicht ausgeschlossen. Bis jetzt ist aber von direkt bedrohten Mammutbäumen nicht die Rede.

Es gibt eine Menge Bilder und Videos, etwa hier oder hier.

Die aktuellsten Updates erhält man in so einem Fall meist auf Twitter, etwa im Yosemite NPS channel (mit weiteren #links.)

Eine schöne Luftaufnahme (mal sehen wie lange der Link stabil bleibt?)

Einen Einstieg in das Thema mit wertvollen Bildern und Informationen findet man auch über die englischsprachige Wikipedia, beispielsweise indem man den Links der Unterseite 2009 California Wildfires folgt. In diesem Jahr brannte im August ebenfalls der Yosemite ( -> Kapitel 'Mariposa' - im Mariposa Grove wird aber seit geraumer Zeit sowieso mit 'prescribed burns' gearbeitet.)
« Letzte Änderung: 24-September-2013, 02:14 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #10 am: 24-September-2013, 02:07 »

... To Do: Beschreibung der Feuerzyklen ....
« Letzte Änderung: 27-September-2013, 16:56 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #11 am: 26-September-2013, 00:32 »

Man muß sich einmal vorstellen, wie es zu einer großflächigen Keimung kommt:

Ein typischerweise im Sommer / Herbst durchziehendes, mäßges Feuer verbrennt Gebüsch, jüngerre Bäume sowie die Streuschicht inklusive Ästen und Zweigen (engl: Litter) an der Oberfläche und hinterlässt eine Ascheschicht über dem Mineralboden. Es schädigt dabei Wurzeln oder Leitbahnen im Stamm des Mammutbaumes; seltener auch die Krone selber - gerade die produktiven älteren Mammutbäume haben oft dutzende Meter astfreien Stamm, das Feuer gelangt nicht in die Krone, welche in großer Höhe auch nicht primär unter dem heißen Luftstrom leidet.

Aufgrund der unterbrochenen Wasserversorgung sterben in der Krone tausende von Zapfen ab, die sonst noch viele Jahre grün bleiben könnten. Mit der Austrocknung öffnen sich die Zapfenschuppen und die Samen fallen nach und nach heraus.

Eine Ausnahme sind Wälder in denen es über 50 Jahre lang nicht gebrannt hat, hier können nachwachsende Jungbäume 'Feuerleitern' in die Krone bilden, die dann im Feuersturm sogar komplett verbrennen können. Der normale Feuerzyklus (ohne menschlichen Eingriff) war in der Vergangenheit, jedenfalls in den untersuchten Groves, etwa alle 15 - 30 Jahre.

Auf die herabgefallenen, teilweise schon im Herbst oder im Frühjahrs-Schnee keimenden Samen geht - und aufgrund der Sekundärschäden nach dem Feuer sogar verstärkt - bald ein Regen aus Litter nieder. In der ersten Wachstumsperiode können sich die Keimlinge hier wahrscheinlich problemlos hindurchschieben, der Litter schützt Samen und Keimlinge sogar vor zuviel direkter Sonne und verzögert das Austrocknen des Bodens.

Bergmammutbäume werfen jedes Jahr große Mengen an Streu ab. Bei den Cupressaceen fallen dabei - im Gegensatz zu Tannen oder Kiefern - auch größere Triebe ab. Wenn aber vergleichsweise große Triebe auf kleine Sämlinge fallen, müssen diese umgebogen und teilweise ganz bedeckt werden. Das dürfte ein oder mehrere Jahre in der Höhenentwicklung kosten, oder sogar ganz zum Ausfall führen. Dennoch scheinen genügend Sämlinge durchzukommen.

Etwas an Bildern wie diesem aus dem Mariposa Grove, hochgeladen von Patrick (PeddyPatrone), fällt immer wieder auf. Auch diese Sämlinge wachsen in einer Streuschicht. Man sieht aber mindestens anteilig auch Kiefern-Nadeln. Auch in diesem sehr schönen Bild ebenfalls aus dem Mariposa Grove, welches dankenswerterweise von Ralf (Taunusbonsai) hochgeladen wurde, sieht man Kiefernnadeln, und zwar ausschließlich.

Es stellt sich die Frage, ob Mammutbaumkeimlinge unter Kiefern oder Tannen (welche nach einem Brand mit einiger Wahrscheinlichkeit sogar ganz absterben) bessere Chancen haben als direkt unter einem Altbaum. Das würde im Hinblick auf die weitere Entwicklung sogar Sinn machen.
« Letzte Änderung: 26-September-2013, 00:52 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #12 am: 26-September-2013, 00:38 »

Die Reaktion auf Feuer von Sequoia ist nicht identisch, denn diese Art ist generell nicht auf die Samenkeimung angewiesen und kann selbst nach einem Feuer aus der Stammwurzel neu austreiben.

Hier ein schönes Bild aus einem Sekundärwald auf Maui (Hawaii), man sieht deutlich die verkohlte Rinde.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Starr_070908-9294_Sequoia_sempervirens.jpg

Wieder einmal zeigt sich die Überlegenheit dieser unglaublich vielseitigen Art, bei der selbst dünne Jungbäume ein Feuer überleben. Im selben Areal hätten Bergmammutbäume nur in einer speziellen Situation eine Chance, nicht verdrängt zu werden: Wenn sehr heiße Feuer nur noch die größten und dicksten Altbäume übriglassen.

Diese spezielle Nische, bei der die Bäume die größtmögliche Zerstörung suchen müssen, um zu überleben, ist für mich das Faszinierendste am Bergmammutbaum.
« Letzte Änderung: 26-September-2013, 00:47 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Ökologie des Keimlings -- Feuer
« Antwort #13 am: 27-August-2021, 14:25 »

Es gibt eine Menge Bilder und Videos, etwa hier oder hier.

Damit der Bergmammutbaum angesichts des diesjährigen KM-Hypes nicht zu kurz kommt, noch ein paar Links (ich füge später noch weitere hinzu):

Feuerökologie  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmNZGr9Udx8

'Whitethorn' Tree komplett verbrannt https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qK7I6K7pq_I

Generell interessante Einblicke, und Leute, finde ich:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn_k0AsRlJI

Der Film ist wirklich wert gesehen zu werden daher bringe ich den Link später nochmal !

by the way, ein 'prescribed fire' funkioniert vorbeugend gegen den allzuheißen Feuersturm, in ähnlicher Weise wie eine Impfung gegen eine gefährliche Viruserkrankung !

Das Caldor-Feuer in der nördlichen Sierra Nevada brennt sich gerade auf den Lake Tahoe zu. Vielleicht erreicht es auch noch den Placer Grove !

Eine Fahrt über den Highway 50:
https://www.facebook.com/Envirolize/videos/567547870925420/

Auf dieser Höhe der Nord-Sierra gab es bis vor den Eiszeiten noch mehr Giant Sequoia Groves als die heutigen Placer und Calaveras Grove-Relikte, wie Fossilien zb. vom Mt. Reba zeigen.

In diesem Zusammenhang kann man sich diese beiden Podcasts mal anhören (engl):

2017  ... 

https://www.kvpr.org/environment/2017-11-21/can-giant-sequoias-survive-californias-next-long-drought

und 5 Jahre später ...

https://www.kvpr.org/2022-02-18/wildfires-climate-change-and-drought-a-conversation-about-the-biggest-threats-to-giant-sequoias






« Letzte Änderung: 20-Februar-2022, 20:21 von Tuff »
Gespeichert

Tuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Beiträge: 5121
    • tuff
Re: Bergmammutbaum (Sequoiadendron): Ökologie des Keimlings
« Antwort #14 am: 27-August-2021, 14:29 »

Ich denke das Thema 'Dürre' muss ebenfalls zusammen mit dem Keimling diskutiert werden, denn gerade Keimlinge und junge Bäume leiden, wenns richtig hart kommt, mehr darunter als bereits etablierte alte Bäume - trotz deren gigantischen Wasservebrauchs.

Auswirkungen der zunehmenden Dürren auf die Groves:

Schnee ist der schlüssel (ab min 6:40):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn_k0AsRlJI

Schnee ist der Schlüssel !
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmNZGr9Udx8

Highlight: Deutsche Touristen bei min 6:20 ... kennt die jemand ? ;)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Cn8FsOsBmY 

Diesen Link füge ich zugegebenermaßen nur wegen der wunderbaren Kletterszenen ab min 2:30 ein ... Dave Katz ist wirkliche eine 'Katze'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRw1DVanjyA

« Letzte Änderung: 29-August-2021, 01:55 von Tuff »
Gespeichert
 

Seite erstellt in 0.188 Sekunden mit 23 Abfragen.